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Resources

Updates to the CTR Policy

Tuesday, 04 April 2017
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The policy for Care and Treatment Reviews, also called CTRs, changed in March 2017. View the latest policy: View the CTR (including CETR) Revised Policy View the Easy Read Revised Policy Key changes in the CTR policy These are the key changes in the Care and Treatment Review policy introduced in 2017: Greater focus on the quality of CTRs and the values which underpin them New measurable national standards by which CTRs are to be carried out Clearer emphasis that CTRs are for people with autism, as well as for people with learning disabilities A separate Policy Annex on Care and Treatment Reviews for children and young people and a change of name to Care, Education and Treatment Reviews, (CETRs)…
 

MP Welcomes Improved Accessible Housing Legislation

Tuesday, 04 April 2017
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Written by Mark Lawrence Heidi Allen MP has welcomed legislation to improve accessibility for elderly and disabled people in new housing developments. Heidi Allen has welcomed the decision to keep her amendment in the Neighbourhood Planning Bill, which was passed unanimously. In December 2016, Heidi Allen, MP for South Cambridgeshire, tabled an amendment to the Neighbourhood Planning Bill. The amendment required local planning authorities to “consider” the needs of elderly and disabled people when identifying strategic priorities for the development and use of their land. During debate in the House of Commons, housing minister Gavin Barwell agreed to work with Mrs Allen to secure this amendment at its next stage in the House of Lords. Since December, Mrs Allen has…
 
This page provides information on the Housing LIN Extra Care Housing Annual Conference 2017 – London. It contains all presentation slides and documents. Click here to view the web page
 
I was diagnosed with Epilepsy aged 12 having suffer regular seizures both Grand Mal/ Tonic Clonic and abscent seizures. I was medicated with the medication Epilim (Sodium Valproate) The advice given to me by my Neurologist, was always to take my medication as this would help control my seizures, so trusting the experts always done so. When I first got pregnant with my daughter, my husband and I decided to have my ante-natel care at my local hospital as that was also where my Neurologist was based. Throughout all my pregnancies my medical team were aware I was on Epilim, and the advice my husband and I was given, was to carry on taking my medication and to increase my dosage…
 

The invisible link between Autism and Anorexia

Thursday, 18 February 2016
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  BY CARRIE ARNOLD   Louise Harrington was starting to doubt that she had anorexia. She knew she was shockingly underweight, and she desperately wanted to gain at least 30 pounds. She had no desire to look like a model. She had no phobia of fatness. She wasn’t afraid to gain weight. She didn’t have any of the typical body image worries that overwhelm many people with anorexia. Instead, what trapped Louise in a haze of malnutrition and compulsive exercise for more than 30 years was that eating too little and exercising too much blunted the feelings of overwhelming anxiety that threatened to drown her. (Louise asked that we not use her real name.) The psychologists and psychiatrists she visited couldn’t…
 

Mazars report/ scandal says Rob Greig

Wednesday, 17 February 2016
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‘A learning disability scandal is being swept under the carpet’ Rob Greig, former Department of Health director for learning disabilities, says the silence on a damning review of Southern Health is worrying February 16, 2016 in Adults, Disability   By Rob Greig The Justice for LB campaign is widely, and rightly, viewed as one of the most successful examples of the mobilisation of public opinion to challenge service failure. For those not familiar with it, Connor Sparrowhawk, a young man with learning disabilities, died while under the care of Southern Health NHS Foundation Trust in July 2013. Given the trust’s failure to accept responsibility, Connor’s family and friends launched the Justice for LB campaign (Laughing Boy, ‘LB’, was Connor’s nickname). The trust initially said Connor…
 
  Guide to claiming DLA for children with disabilities -  This guide is for anyone, parent or professional, who is considering making a claim for Disability Living Allowance (DLA), on behalf of a child under 16 years of age who has a neurological or   neurodevelopmental condition. This includes conditions like autistic spectrum conditions, ADHD, cerebral palsy, Down’s syndrome, epilepsy, learning difficulties, global developmental delay and acquired brain injuries among others.Covering such a wide range of conditions means that, inevitably not everything in the guide will be applicable to all children. The intention is that you can use whatever is most appropriate and expand on it with your own examples.
 

Disabled Children: A Legal Handbook 2nd edition

Monday, 15 February 2016
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Disabled children: a legal handbook is an authoritative yet accessible guide to the legal rights of disabled children and their families in England and Wales. The authors expertly navigate the many, often overlapping, sources of law, explaining the difference between what public bodies must do to support disabled children and that which they may do. The handbook aims to empower disabled children and their families through a greater understanding of their rights and entitlements. It is essential reading for the families of disabled children, their advocates and lawyers, voluntary and statutory sector advisers, commissioners, managers and lawyers working for public authorities, education, social and health care professionals, students and academics. Each chapter has been adapted into a PDF for you…
 
I've worked with many people in different end-of-life and palliative care settings, from 10-year-old children to a woman who lived well into her 98th year. My aim as an end-of-life doula is to create an environment where the sorts of questions that no one has felt able to ask are broached and discussed. No matter what someone is asking, the most important thing is that they are heard. That their pain and anguish, their hopes and dreams, their worries and their fears are all given a voice. When a person at the end of their life is talking, the greatest gift we can give them is to listen. Here are the most common questions I'm asked, and how I respond.…
 
Terminally ill patients are to be encouraged by an NHS Trust to write their own 'end-of-life plan' instructing doctors, nurses and family about their wishes for their final months, days and hours. The document is based on birth plans that pregnant women commonly draw up with their midwives, and takes the form of a single-page grid detailing the personal wishes of the patient about every aspect of their care. Subsections include: 'What will be important to me...', 'How to support me and those I love...', 'What MUST happen...', and 'What MUST NOT happen...' when the patient has months, weeks, and then just days to live, at the time of their death, and then afterwards. Read the full story on the…
 
This booklet provides information for families of people with learning disabilitiesabout the scope and process of NHS continuing healthcare, together with possible implications and questions they may want to ask. Click here to download the booklet A Guide to UK-based Free Mental Health Helplines by Cassiobury Court.
 

Care and Treatment Reviews

Thursday, 04 February 2016
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Care and Treatment Reviews (CTR) have been developed as part of NHS England’s commitment to transforming the services for people with learning disabilities and/ or autism who display behaviour that challenges, including those with a mental health condition. The CTR ensures that individuals get the right care, in the right place that meets their needs, and they are involved in any decisions about their care. NHS England has published final CTR policy and guidance (CTR policy and guidance in easy read also available) that outlines what a CTR is, the required standards, and how they should be done, along with a toolkit for commissioners and easy read leaflets for people with learning disabilities and/or autism, and their families or carers. Read…